Go back

Storming, Norming & Forming

Published: 2019-11-26 12:19

I work in a fairly small team of about 8 called the Centre of Excellence (Employer Attractiveness and Talent Acquisition)Team. Because our team is so small, and we work very closely together. A lot of the time I am on projects or calls which involve one or other of the Team, which is really nice. It would be tough otherwise to build relationships, form bonds and foster an understanding of each other. Understanding the team you work in is a huge part of good collaboration. We all have our ways of working and specialties, strengths and passions. I think it’s important to play to each person’s strengths in the team and really utilise the people around you. The COE team is very international as we are spread all over Europe and the US so maintaining that atmosphere of collaboration and trust within the team is very important. Not just for getting the job done but also enjoying what you are doing. Being part of the solution and celebrating as a team a good result (or commiserating a not so good one).

Recently a member of our team left.. Its hard to put into words how much day-to-day things change when a core member of the team leaves. The obvious stuff like “where is that file they were working on” and “I am in a call and I am not sure why” is bound to happen post member leaving. But other things are impacted as well, and this experience has really highlighted something for me: Never underestimate how useful your network is. I mean this both in terms of your direct network (i.e.: your team) but also the wider network of people you work with, email, ask questions of and generally come into contact with professionally. I have made the mistake before of turning on my tunnel vision and trying to solve each problem myself – in order to be both self-reliant and efficient. It’s taken me a while to realise that you can’t do it all, you need your network and the more you use your network the wider and more effective it gets.

Whilst we all feel the absence of our colleagues and friends it’s the willingness to collaborate and the core values of your co-workers that really make an effective team, and by extension your network. I’ve lost count the amount of times somebody in my network has aided or helped me achieve something.

I guess the presiding lesson I’ve learnt recently is this: Be part of the team, be part of the solution and your network and co-workers might just surprise you!

Author
Max Gordon

Digital Communication Specialist

Max Gordon´s blog

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Go back

More from United Kingdom

Max Gordon

Digital Communication Specialist

Storming, Norming & Forming
November 26, 2019
Max Gordon

Digital Communication Specialist

We’re Back!
November 13, 2017
Max Gordon

Digital Communication Specialist

Follow blog

Hi, my name is Max. I am 26 and having finished the Essity GO! Graduate Program in August I am currently working as a Digital Specialist in the Employee Attractiveness division of Essity. A lot of what i do involves making Essity careers visible and exciting to current and potential employees

Max Gordon´s blog
November 26, 2019
November 13, 2017
Essity on social media
More from United Kingdom
Max Gordon

Digital Communication Specialist

Storming, Norming & Forming
November 26, 2019
Max Gordon

Digital Communication Specialist

We’re Back!
November 13, 2017